Lyon: a culinary gem amid a violent history

Lyon is a gem of a city. Set on a hilly site, it’s where the Rhône and Saône rivers meet – making it a natural military and commercial junction and an attractive location in its own right. Its long history dates back to Roman times when it was called Lugdunum and was the capital of Roman Gaul. The city flourished in the Renaissance period; commercial fairs started in 1464 when Italian bankers arrived, and from 1473 it was one of the most active printing centres in Europe. In the 17th century, it was the silk manufacturing capital of Europe. It
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Lakes Charles LA, beautiful and quirky

Take a beautiful national park complete with nature trails, wildlife, including alligators and pink cranes, add a beach, some casinos, plenty of local history, some great local food and a rum distillery and you have Lake Charles in southwest Louisiana. Lake Charles is about 2-3 hours drive west of New Orleans and about the same distance east from Houston, Texas. It’s a town of about 100,000 people with its own port, airport and rail connections as well as the interstate highway. View PDF
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48 hours in San Antonio

San Antonio in southwest Texas is a special place, an in- teresting blend of Spanish, Texan and now Mexican influences where the cowboy tradition is strong and the battle cry of “Remember the Alamo’’ still resonates. A visitor can easily fill 48 hours. Begin your day with breakfast: you’ve got choices. It might be Mexican – huevos rancheros, for example – or Texan – eggs, very crispy bacon, breakfast potato in some form, and biscuits with gravy or grits, plain or with cheese, shrimp and more. And coffee. View PDF
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US jurists in civil rights battle

A lawyer is either a social engineer or a parasite; that’s what Thurgood Marshall, the first black person to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States, was told as a student. He got the message from another leading black jurist, Charles Hamilton Houston, who was dean of the Howard University Law School in Washington DC when Marshall was a graduate student there in the 1930s. View PDF
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Elvis’s legacy is larger than life

Elvis Presley, the great and enduring cultural icon, singer, actor and performer of the 1950s through the 1970s has now been dead just slightly longer than he was alive. His legacy – seen at his Graceland home and complex in Memphis, Tennessee – is thriving and even better after a multimillion dollar upgrade. View PDF
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Civil rights museums attract

It seems odd, even bizarre, that history of brutal oppression and violence against a whole race of people should be presented as a tourist attraction and perhaps even more bizarre that it should be a successful strategy. That is precisely what’s happening in many Southern cities in the United States as Americans show a new willingness to confront their own past and come to terms with it. View PDF
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Kindness of strangers

Travelling’s easier when people go out of their way to help. Three incidents during my latest travels in the United States have reaffirmed my faith in the essential decency of human beings. View PDF  
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Lake Charles Louisiana a secret delight

Take a beautiful national park complete with nature trails, alligators, wildlife in- cluding pink cranes, add a beach, some casinos, plenty of local history, some great local food and a rum distillery and what have you got? Lake Charles in southwest Louisiana, about two to three hours’ drive west of New Or- leans and about the same dis- tance east from Houston in Texas. It’s a town of about 100,000 people with its own port, airport and rail connec- tions, as well as the interstate highway. I had the opportunity to spend 48 hours there breaking my journey from New
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