Archives for Travel

Take a train back in history

The TranzAlpine train trip between Christchurch and Greymouth is well known for its spectacular scenery but it’s also a wonderful journey into the colonial history of Canterbury and the West Coast. The onboard commentary focuses on the achievements, difficulties and failures of building the railway itself, hailed as a marvellous feat of engineering, particularly for its tunnels. Take a train back in history
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Slave to history

Baton Rouge, the state capital of Louisiana in the deep south of the US, is a drawcard for viewing alligators in the swamp, catching crawfish and its rich history of architecture and a “colourful” way of life. But among the highlights are the low-lights of Louisiana: its history of slavery. View as PDF
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The killer bikes of Amsterdam

Amsterdam. The very name conjures up images of tulips, canals, trams, windmills, artists such as Rembrandt and Van Gogh, and yes, cyclists. The Dutch are bike mad and proud of it. Seemingly, everyone has a bike, and they are ridden by all ages, all the time, and often in a very aggressive “we own the path” manner. Cycling in Amsterdam: beware of the killer bikes
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On the 1835 Declaration of Independence

With Waitangi Day on 6 February, some attention will focus on the status and relevance of the Treaty of Waitangi in modern times, and on whether it is the founding document of our country. Some claim that the 1835 Declaration of Independence of the United Tribes of New Zealand is a better model for relations between Māori and other New Zealanders. John Bishop uncovered some widely differing viewpoints when he travelled to Northland recently. View as PDF
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Lord of the forest stands tall

Walking in Waipoua Forest, in Northland, New Zealand we come across Tane Mahuta. We are standing at the base of Tane Mahuta, 16.41m around, 51.2m tall, carbon dated at around 3000 years old. He’s still alive and growing, although slowly. Lord of the forest stands tall
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Buy carefully on London Food Tours

Food tours are enormously popular in many major cities around the world, and often in areas with unique cuisines. London presents a special challenge as Europeans generally look down upon English cooking as stodgy, provincial and unimaginative. John Bishop found there is plenty to be delighted about as he took three food tours around London, with some history and culture thrown in. View article as PDF
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Continental river cruise

There are few things better in life than quietly drifting down two of Europe’s best-known rivers in comfortable surroundings, well fed, with plentiful supplies of wine and other drinks, rising each day to a new town and a new experience. View as PDF
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Low lights of Louisiana

Baton Rouge, the capital of the state of Louisiana, presents a medley of experiences for visitors, both in the city itself and as a jumping off point for the state’s many natural attractions, including swamps, alligators, fine historical houses, and special French flavour not found elsewhere. View as PDF
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A Walking tour of Boston published

A piece I wrote about the joys of walking around Boston has been published in Rotary Downunder, the magazine that goes to 61 000 Rotarians in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands
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Profiling three Kiwi Chefs in New York in the Listener

  As a result of my travels in the US earlier this year I’ve had a piece published in this week’s Listener on three Kiwi chefs making a go of it in New York, including the big guy Matt Lambert whose restaurant holds a Michelin Star. The others are Pauli Morgan of the Nelson Blue bar and restaurant and Mark Simmons of the Kiwiana Café in Brooklyn. A pleasure to talk to all of them.
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